One-method promotion doesn’t sell

Walking around SIUE’s campus, it’s easy to spot flyers for different campus organizations’ events. Though flyering is effective on a college campus, outside of the university, much more needs to be done. 

For example, a lot of the independent wrestling shows I go to rely heavily on either flyering or internet promotions. Individually, neither of those promotional aspects will draw a decent-sized crowd, but when combined, they have the potential to help the companies. 

Each type of advertising targets a different type of audience. Keeping with the wrestling theme, flyers will attract the casual audience—the people who only watch World Wrestling Entertainment or Total Non-stop Action Wrestling. Internet promotion, through MySpace, Facebook and message boards will bring in the ‘smart marks,’ or the hardcore, internet fans. 

Depending on if the promotion has enough funding, they could even pay for, say, a 30-second television commercial to air during a WWE or TNA program, thus increasing the possibility of drawing in casual fans, who make up the largest market base of fans. 

Regardless of the other possibilities, having been to many wrestling promotions across the Midwest, where the bulk of their advertising is through flyering the town and the areas surrounding the event, I can attest to the fact that one avenue of advertising is not enough. All companies, whether big or small, need multiple mediums through which they promote their product or event.

Single methods cannot, and will not, capture every target audience. Companies that rely on one dominant means of promotion can almost guarantee low attendance or little to no profit because they do not reach the full potential of their audience.

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